Filtering e-mail addresses from a huge mound of plain-text

I'm faced with a mailbox full of bounced/undeliverable messages and from that I need to extract all the e-mail addresses that need to be removed from our home-spun mass-mail program.
After messing around a whole bunch, installing a whole mess of different editors and tools that I downloaded from the internet, and wasting a lot of time I finally came up with a solution that works for complex search and replace operations yet uses only the tools that I already have: Excel and Expression Web. I was able to export a mailbox from outlook containing hundreds of messages, and I was able to strip the unique e-mail addresses for each message. Here's the steps I took (minus the figuring out and messing around that I did)…
To make the e-mails useful I exported them into a CSV. From there I took just the message text and pasted that into Microsoft Expression Web. To isolate the e-mail addresses from the rest of the garbage, I searched for this…
[a-zA-Z0-9_.-]#@[a-zA-Z0-9_.-]+ 
…and did a "find all." After that I took my search results and pasted them into a new document and then did a replace funciton where I replaced…
.*[ t<("']{[a-zA-Z0-9_.-]#@[a-zA-Z0-9_.-]+}.*
… with … 
1
It worked, but there was some problem recognising usernames that had a dot in them. There were, naturally, a lot of duplicates, so I pasted that list back into excel and performed this…
=IF(COUNTIF(A1:A670,A1)>1,"",A1)
…in the column next to the e-mail addresses. That told me whether or not there are duplicates below the current line. I filled the formula down to the end of the column. I copied that column and pasted as values into the next column, then I sorted the values and I have a list of e-mails with no duplicates, ready to be used.

A little bit about inheritance and NTFS

I learned CORRECTLY how file and folder inheritance propagation works in NTFS. I can't believe I've gone this long without knowing how it works! I had believed that the utmost authority for inheritance was the parent, but now I know that is not true. Things start backwards with the child deny, then child allow, then parent deny, then parent allow, and so on.

Moving a MySQL database

You just need a couple commands…

::CODECOLORER_BLOCK_1::

then…

::CODECOLORER_BLOCK_2::

This explains how to do it…

Enjoy

MySQL on Linux

MySQL is foreign to me, and this is really basic stuff, but here it is:
I figured out how to access mysql on linux…
mysql -h localhost -u username -p
… it then prompts for the password. From there you "use collection_name;" to choose the collection_name databases,
"show databases;" will…well…duh!
"show tables;"